Vintage Romance-Romantic Suspense-Cozy Mystery



What I write 
in five words

          I had this topic on my blog calendar, but this afternoon while sitting at the chiropractor’s office, someone asked what I wrote. The first word out       of my mouth was clean. Maybe that was a sign I should write this blog now.

·        Clean

I write about real people in real life situations, but you won’t find any obscenities or gratuitous profanity. Some of my characters, being who they are, speak roughly in certain situations but not constantly. I also don’t interrupt the action for a hot sex scene because I think I’ll lose my readers’ interest if I don’t put it in. I’m from the era where the music swells, the door closes, and one is left to one’s own happy imaginings.

·        Adult

I don’t write for “young adults” but rather “mature adults”. Often my characters are older people who’ve been around the block. I include characters with handicaps (which isn’t the politically correct word today, but it gets the point across), and those who have “messed up” and gotten up and gone on.

·        Introspective

While I want to entertain readers, I want to put include some food for thought, too. People aren’t so different. We all experience happiness and sadness, struggle to find meaning and to forgive, want to dream of something more. My characters are real people with flaws like the rest of us.

·         Nostalgic

Even in a modern setting, I like to hark back to earlier days. My favorite time periods are those dark days of the Great Depression and World War II, maybe because both influenced my life.

·         Southern

With the exception of my first two books, the others are set in the south because that’s what I know. I’ve even written one set in my hometown (Dancing with Velvet) and think of it as a sort of love song to the place I grew up and which shaped me as a person. Since retiring to Arkansas, I’ve found great settings and ideas right here.

          I’m not “politically correct”, nor am I agenda-driven. What you read in the first chapter is what you’re going to get in the rest of the book. That          said, I hope you’ll give one of my books a try.

 

SPOILER: Look for a link to another free read before August is over!


What scares me most--then and now

        At this stage of the game, not much scares me at all. So let’s start with what used to terrify me:

·            the dark

·            fire—specifically, the house burning down while I was asleep

·            something happening to me when I was alone with my children

·            driving

·            being alone


So that’s the big five.

I could explain each one in depth, but that’s beside the point. Yes, there were reasons. Yes, they seemed valid at the time. No, I’m not afraid anymore. Why? Fear cripples and imprisons, and I wanted to walk with my face to the sun and be free. It wasn’t easy, and it didn’t happen overnight, but I conquered them all. Of course, I didn’t  do it alone.

So what am I afraid of?

·            Leaving unfinished business:  writing, genealogy, personal business

·            Not leaving the legacy I want to my grandchildren—the example of faith, trust, womanly strength in the Lord

·            Being dependent


Those are the big three.

Again, I could go into depth on each, but they’re pretty much self-explanatory. The first two I can do something about. The third—that’s not up to me except through taking care of my health and financial planning  as best I can.

Fear is my “dirty” word. Does that make me throw common sense to the wind? Absolutely not. Does it make me take that first step when I’m tempted not to move? Absolutely yes.

“Be Not Afraid” is a song we sing some Sundays in church. Here’s the YouTube linkIt’s a worthwhile listen.


Old dogs, new tricks, and thirsty horses...
OR
What I would like to learn to do!

     

     When computers first found their way into the public schools, the teachers in the school where I worked were offered several free tutorial sessions taught by a colleague who truly knew his stuff.

     I didn’t attend.

     Why?

     Pure and simple, I don’t pick up on technological information easily, and even at the age I was then (almost 50) I feared being laughed at for asking questions

     Rewind to junior high school when I sat in the back of every math classroom and hoped the teacher would forget I was there. Confused? Horribly. Ask questions? Not on your great-granny’s tin type! I shed many tears of frustration as I slogged through math, relieved when I finally earned the two required graduation credits and could flee from all things numerical.

     So, most of what I’ve learned about the computer—and I consider myself above moderately skillful—has been self-taught through following printed instructions and hours of trial and error. Over the years a few people earned my trust enough for me to feel comfortable asking specific questions.

     But I digress from the topic at hand: What would I like to learn how to do?

     Yesterday I taught myself how to upload a file as a free download from my website. It was an exciting moment when I checked out the link and discovered it worked. Picture me grinning from ear to ear. But there’s more I’d like to learn:

1.       How to do more with a picture editing program than resize or crop

2.       How to plumb the depths of the inner workings of my computer—in other words, what makes it tick?

3.       How to create a podcast—something more than just an online video to be posted to Facebook

4.       How to solve some of the little quirky accidents that happen within a word document such as a 2-5 character scene divider which becomes one long line if one hits “enter” in the wrong place—and won’t come out!

5.       How to successfully do headers and footers the FIRST time

6.       How to successfully use Excel to create graphs and charts

     And there’s more, but that’s a good place to start. I’ve found work-arounds for various situations, but I know there are easier and better fixes. I can make book trailers, and I’ve learned to use sites like Canva to create all sorts of social media graphics.

     If you’re shaking your head and saying, “Oh, none of that is hard,” I recommend you walk in the moccasins of one who is spatially challenged like I am. Though I am by no means stupid, it takes both visual, auditory, and kinesthetic methods to teach me. If you pick it up at the drop of a hat, good for you!

     The upside of all this is—when I taught school as a special ed teacher and also in the regular classroom—I could empathize with my students’ difficulties. They soon learned I meant it when I said, “If you don’t understand, ask me to tell/show you again. There are no dumb questions.” I’d been there-done that, you see.

     I learned to explain things six ways to Sunday, and it was wonderful to see the light go on and chase away the darkness of confusion.

     The old saying, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is erroneous. I am an old dog, and I learn new tricks all the time. The true saying is, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.” If one doesn’t want to learn—which means trying and failing and trying again—he can’t be taught.

     I have an insatiable thirst for new knowledge and skills, even at my age. Life is indeed an adventure!



Interview with

Larry McClure
Police Chief of Diamond Springs MS

JN: You’re rather young to be a police chief, aren’t you?

LMC: Yeah, I guess so, but I’m qualified. Degree in criminal justice. Tons of training at the Police

Academy. And experience. That’s a lot more important.

JN: I guess a place like Diamond Springs doesn’t have much crime anyway.

LMC: You’d be surprised.

JN: I saw you having breakfast with that Yankee reporter…

LMC: Investigative journalist. There’s a difference.

JN: Everybody wants to know what he’s doing here…why he’s hanging around out at the college.

LMC: He’s on assignment. A story.

JN: There’s a story out there?

LMC: There’s history running out the doors. Where’ve you been?

JN: I’ve heard that Senator Clanton wants to close down Ainsleigh College and turn it into a resort.

LMC: That’ll never happen, not while Dr. Ainsleigh is around.

JN: I’ve heard he’s not…well.

LMC: Places like this like to gossip.

JN: And then there’s the unconventional relationship he has with one of the professors.

LMC: If you mean interracial, say it. Miscegenation laws are long gone in Mississippi.

JN: And some people say the daughter…his daughter, I believe…isn’t quite…right.

LMC: Some people say anything they want to. That doesn’t make it true.

JN: And what about Bennie Carpenter?

LMC: Happened forty years ago. Before I was born.

JN: I understand it was the only lynching in the history of the county.

LMC: It was one too many as far as I’m concerned. Chief Mackey was in charge then.

JN: The brother’s still around. Joe. Has that barbecue place.

LMC: That’s right. Made a small fortune with it, too.

JN: I’ve picked up all kinds of tidbits since I’ve been here, so you may be right about Diamond Springs not being as peaceful as it seems.

LMC: Not many places are.

JN: My next stop is The Springs. Professor Collins is meeting me there. He seems to think it’s haunted.

LMC: I’ve got more important things to do than worry about Collins’ spirits. Just stay out of trouble, huh? (walks off)

JN: Obviously I’m not going to get much out of him. But I’ve got others on my list. Miss Eleanor Pickett’s in charge of the historical society, and her family founded the town. I’ll bet she knows everything about everybody.

LMC: I heard that. You can talk to her, I guess, but you might find out a whole lot more than you want to know. (Gets into patrol car and drives away)

 




 
 
You can get in touch with me at: judynickles@gmail.com

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